Our nation's journalists have become a bunch of soft dweebs

Jul 7th

In the last century, reporters have risked the dangers of warzone after warzone to bring news of the front lines to those at home.

Others reported on criminal empires and powerful politicians that could make them disappear in a heartbeat.

Still others yet went undercover or spent time away from family and friends in far-flung locales where they boldly hunted down the truth.

Now, our esteemed journalist class gets triggered by a bunch of unarmed neckbeards that broke some windows and wandered through the halls of Congress taking photos.

Yes, the "journalists who survived," which would be [checks notes] ALL of them.

...The emotional scars are still there. Six months after their office was attacked, the Capitol Hill press corps is grappling with how to cover the insurrection's fallout, as well as its impact on them personally and professionally.

Some reporters who were there won't go back into the building. A number have sought therapy to deal with the trauma. One longtime Capitol Hill reporter opted for early retirement shortly after living through the riot. Many still aren't sleeping well.

These dweebs have injected the same poison they've been selling to America: the exaggerated lie of pervasive right-wing violence that's waiting for the opportunity to burn the nation to the ground, while covering for the actual left-wing groups that are literally burning the nation to the ground.

Here are a few of their HARROWING tales:

  • PBS NewsHour correspondent Lisa Desjardins: "I'm still not sleeping like I used to, even to this day. I became kind of an insomniac."
  • Matt Laslo, a reporter working for The Daily Beast that day: "It's my office, the building I love most in the [flowerbedding] world. I used to call the Capitol my girlfriend. I've devoted 15 years of my g--d--m life to that building. Now? Instead of being there every day,I'm there once a month. I don't want to be there."
  • Bloomberg News reporter Erik Wasson: "It definitely could happen again. It's something that's on my radar. We've become very complacent in thinking the U.S. is different. It's eerily back to normal. But sometimes It feels like one of those horror movies, like the end of ‘Jaws.' Everything feels copacetic on the beach. But you wonder if there's anything out there."

Yep, it was JUST like Jaws!

Wasson was also completely paranoid in the weeks after. Thank goodness this guy didn't have to report on the 88 people shot in Chicago last weekend or the newest city block Antifa is setting on fire!

...In the weeks after, Wasson said he experienced symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder—depression, short-tempered irritability that led to fights with his wife over nothing. This went on for nearly a month.

"I do remember just feeling unsafe in my house," said Wasson. "It occurred to me, like, I wonder if some protesters could be tracking me or could show up at my house. There was definitely a moment of fear, and just trying to assess whether there was actually any danger to me and my family."

What. A. Dweeb.

NBC politics editor Ginger Gibson couldn't fathom why the rioters were angry at the press:

"That day we weren't just observers; we were one of their targets. A lot of us reporters are having a tough time with that."

Yeah, it's not like the press has demonized half of this nation over the course of decades and has spent the last 6 months reporting endlessly on this riot like it was the end of the world at the hands of deranged terrorists while doing everything they can to dox, shame, and destroy their political enemies!

You know, like what VICE is doing through this garbage story about the vEry eNd oF dEmoCraCy.

Here were a few condolences from concerned citizens who wanted to make sure the journalists get the help they need:

But this hits the nail on the head:

What an embarrassing clown show.


P.S. Now check out our latest video: Wait, liberals are the ones who are grateful for America?? 👇

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