This woman went into labor during an 11-hour flight from Ghana to D.C. and delivered a healthy boy thanks to passengers and the crew ✊

Feb 3rd

On Saturday night, United Flight 997 left Accra, Ghana, headed for Washington D.C. The flight takes about eleven hours, and while usually these types of things are boring, this flight was quite the contrary.

Yes, a woman who is only known as GG for the time being started having contractions about halfway through the 11-hour flight. A nearby passenger noticed her struggle and sent for a flight attendant.

Luckily, one of the flight attendants happened to be a nurse, and when an announcement went out on board asking for medical professionals, both Dr. Stephen Ansah-Addo of the University of Michigan and a nurse from Dayton, Ohio also jumped into action.

They turned the area behind business class into an operation room of sorts -- putting down blankets and towels. The mother's contractions were getting stronger and more frequent, and after just an hour, Ansah-Addo felt the baby's head.

An hour?!?!?!

I'm sorry, but is there some sort of high-altitude trick to giving birth?

Because if so, this method should be offered to all pregnant women.

Just sayin'...

Anyhow, a few minutes later United Flight 997 had itself a newborn baby boy—the cutest little bundle of joy you've ever seen.

Here are some photos for you:

And I love this quote right here from the doctor:

"This is the reason why you go into medicine, to help people," Ansah-Addo said. "This is someone that really needed help, because there was nobody else there. This is the kind of medicine where you can make a difference in people's lives."

Paramedics met the woman and her newborn when they landed in D.C., and other than being 30,000 feet in the air, I think I'd say this delivery went pretty well.

Great work, team!

And happy birthday, young man!


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