The Taliban just rolled into Kabul, took over Bagram Air Base, and released thousands of terrorists from prison 👀

Aug 15th

U.S. and Afghan authorities confirmed Sunday that Taliban forces had overtaken Bagram Air Base, a strategic air operations installation used by American forces over the past 20 years.

The Taliban have reportedly released thousands of prisoners that were held at Bagram, including members of al Qaeda, the terror group that carried out the 9-11 attacks and prompted the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan in 2001. Bagram was under control of the U.S. military for roughly two decades before leaving it in control of the Afghan military in July as the U.S. pulled out of Afghanistan.

The Taliban has also entered the nation's capital, Kabul, after overtaking huge swaths of territory in the last week as American troops withdrew.

Taliban leaders are reportedly at the presidential palace in Kabul, Afghanistan, negotiating a swift "transfer of power" from the Afghan government in place.

Residents of Kabul and refugees who took shelter in the Afghan capital city over the last several weeks as the Taliban seized power in the country's southern provinces are now trying to flee the city, but finding roads blocked and airports now under Taliban control.

The evacuation of the U.S. embassy now involves dangerous hurdles, as explained by Bill Roggio, managing editor of The Long War Journal.

Some who served in Afghanistan expressed frustration with the Biden administration for letting the nation fall after sacrificing thousands of American soldiers and spending trillions over 20 years to secure the country.

On July 8, President Biden said the Taliban takeover of the nation was not inevitable as he announced the U.S. was withdrawing, saying they had 300,000 soldiers that were "as well equipped as any army in the world."

Peter Heck has thoughts:


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