Watch As Lawyer Details Biden SCOTUS Nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson's Embrace Of Critical Race Theory

Mar 20th

Joe Biden's nominee for the Supreme Court, Ketanji Brown Jackson, has become subject to criticisms from the right for her radical left values.

Earlier this week, Josh Hawley detailed how Brown Jackson has a history of giving extreme leniency to child p*rn offenders and being soft on sexual crimes.

Not only is she soft on sex crimes and pedophiles, but Brown Jackson also has praised prominent Critical Race Theory scholars, such as Derrick Bell, as conservative lawyer Harmeet K. Dillon detailed in a Fox News interview.

So, for decades, Brown Jackson says she has admired the work of racist theorist Derrick Bell.

Daily Wire further reports on this story.

A review of a handful of Jackson's lectures and speeches from the past seven years shows that the nominee has a strong appreciation for leading proponents of CRT, a progressive idea that holds in part: "racism is endemic to, rather than a deviation from, American norms," legal scholar Kimberle Crenshaw, who coined the term, wrote in 1989. While Jackson has avoided openly championing CRT, she has complimented its advocates and suggested that the progressive theory informs her legal analysis...

In January 2020, Jackson gave a lecture to the University of Michigan Law School as part of its Martin Luther King, Jr. Day celebration. In a speech on "Black Women Leaders In The Civil Rights Movement Era And Beyond," Jackson said she took inspiration from one of the works of the late Derrick Bell, who is often touted as the godfather of CRT.

Bell's 1993 book, "Faces At The Bottom Of The Well: The Permanence Of Racism," was a fixture of Jackson's childhood. The work is "a pioneering contribution to critical race theory scholarship, and it remains urgent and essential reading on the problem of racism in America."

"My parents had this book on their coffee table for many years, and I remember staring at the image on the cover when I was growing up; I found it difficult to reconcile the image of the person, who seemed to be smiling, with the depressing message that the title and subtitle conveyed. I thought about this book cover again for the first time in forty years when I started preparing for this speech, because, before the civil rights gains of the 1960s, black women were the quintessential faces at the bottom of the well of American society, given their existence at the intersection of race and gender — both of which were highly disfavored characteristics," Jackson said.

Jackson also credits the work of Bell's widow, Janet Dewart Bell, another leading CRT advocate. Jackson said Dewart Bell first illuminated many of the "observations that I am presenting." "I have drawn heavily from her excellent insights," Jackson said.

During her lecture, Jackson also highlighted The New York Times' "1619 Project" and its architect, "acclaimed investigative journalist" Nikole Hannah-Jones. The 1619 Project began as a series of essays, later repurposed into educational materials for K-12 students, that claimed the United States' "true founding" took place in 1619 with the arrival of the first slave ship in the U.S.

Brown Jackson is a radical leftist and believes nonsense like the 1619 project is "real history" and praises Derrick Bell and Kimberle Crenshaw.

This in itself should be disqualifying for a Supreme Court Justice.


P.S. Now check out our viral vid "How to speak Bidenese" 😁 👇

Keep up with our latest videos — Subscribe to our YouTube channel!

Comments

There are 44 comments on this article.

Ready to join the conversation? Start your free trial today.

Access comments and our fully-featured social platform, completely free of charge.

Sign up Now
App screenshot

You must signup or login to view or post comments on this article.