New report says China produces more emissions than the U.S. and all other developed countries COMBINED πŸ‘€

May 6th

While our conversations around pollution have centered around the Western world, it turns out that China is blowing us all out of the water in greenhouse emissions and it isn't even close:

China's gas emissions have tripled over the last three decades and now surpass the emissions of all other developed nations combined.

"China is now responsible for more than 27% of total global emissions. The U.S., which is the world's second highest emitter, accounts for 11% of the global total. India is responsible for 6.6% of global emissions, edging out the 27 nations in the E.U., which account for 6.4%, the report said."

It's not like we didn't know China's pollution was a problem. Like the businessman in The Lorax film, a Canadian company has made a killing selling regular and luxury canned air to China:

President Xi has promised to reduce the nation's dependance on coal, a pledge I'm sure he'll get to once he's achieved world domination.

"China, which is home to over 1.4 billion people, saw its emissions surpass 14 gigatons of carbon dioxide equivalents in 2019, more than triple 1990 levels and a 25% increase over the past decade, the Rhodium report found. China's per capita emissions in 2019 also reached 10.1 tons, nearly tripling over the past two decades.

China's net emissions last year also increased by roughly 1.7% even while emissions from almost all other countries declined during the coronavirus pandemic, according to Rhodium estimates."

While there are plenty of scientists warning that our current climate alarmism is dangerously overblown, if you are passionate about the issue, you might want to stop listening to politicians who point to American Republicans as the source of the problem and focus on who is actually driving the world's pollution.


P.S. Now check out our latest video: "The Media's Constant Lies Are Fueling This Chaos" πŸ‘‡

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