"This is a national emergency": Fentanyl overdose becomes #1 cause of death in U.S. for 18–45 year-olds; fatalities DOUBLED from 2019 to 2021

Dec 19th

Data from the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) shows Fentanyl overdoses were the No. 1 cause of death among 18– to 45-year-old Americans in the past year.

Families Against Fentanyl (FAF), an opioid awareness organization, reports 79,000 people in 2020 and 2021 died of fentanyl overdoses.

"This is a national emergency. America's young adults — thousands of unsuspecting Americans — are being poisoned," said FAF founder James Rauh in a statement. "It is widely known that illicit fentanyl is driving the massive spike in drug-related deaths. A new approach to this catastrophe is needed."

Fox News reports Fentanyl overdoses surpassed car accidents, cancer, gun violence, and suicide as the cause of death.

"Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid that is 80-100 times stronger than morphine," according to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA). "Because of its powerful opioid properties, Fentanyl is also diverted for abuse. Fentanyl is added to heroin to increase its potency, or be disguised as highly potent heroin."

Fentanyl deaths doubled from 32,754 to 64,178 deaths from April 2019 to 2021.

"Experts believe there is a correlation between the impact of the coronavirus pandemic and the recent increase in fentanyl overdoses," Fox News reports.

Mexico and China are the top countries from which fentanyl is coming into the U.S., according to the DEA.

"Fentanyl has been found in all the drug supply. That's why anyone using drugs, not just opioids, should carry naloxone," said Dr. Roneet Lev, emergency physician and former chief medical officer of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP).

"The only safe place to obtain drugs is the pharmacy."

This is a catastrophe.

Also, China flooding the U.S. with fentanyl on purpose, change my mind.


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