Canada goes full "Minority Report" with bill that would allow courts to PREEMPTIVELY penalize citizens for "hateful" speech they haven't actually said yet

Feb 24th

Well, if things in Canada aren't already too disturbing, we have this little nugget of news for you:

In addition to their normal job of enforcing the law, courts would be tasked under this proposed law with discerning the future in order to punish people in the present.

This is real-life Minority Report happening in Canada.

They are going to guess, based on past and current behavior, whether or not you are going to commit a future hate crime.

The problem, of course, is multifaceted.

  • First, there's no fool-proof way of predicting the future, so the law is stupid on this grounds alone.
  • Also, the premise of the law, "predicting hate speech" is incredibly anti-freedom of speech. This may not matter in Canada, but as a principle, it should be defended. In Canada, they consider preaching the Gospel "hate speech," after all.
  • It weaponizes citizens to turn one another in to the authorities.

More from The Post Millennial:

Bill C-36 states that "a person may, with the Attorney General's consent, lay an information before a provincial court judge if the person fears on reasonable grounds that another person will commit (a) an offence under section 318 [advocating genocide] or subsection 319" [inciting or promoting hate, promoting hatred].

It also covers "an offence motivated by bias, prejudice or hate based on race, national or ethnic origin, language, colour, religion, sex, age, mental or physical disability, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, or any other similar factor."

Diversity Minister Ahmed Hussen reintroduced the legislation after events that transpired in Ottawa, in which a very small number of individuals at the freedom convoy protest carried hateful symbols, including the swastika.

Please, "Diversity Minister," tell me on a diagram where the honking hurt you.

Can you imagine how such power could be abused??


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